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What Are The Alternatives to Filing Bankruptcy?

  

Debtors who have faced obstacles to paying off their debts when due have no doubt received more than their fair share of demanding letters and phone calls, and the thought of filing bankruptcy and getting rid of their debts, and thus the constant demands, can be quite appealing. Before making a decision to pursue that route, which can have long-term effects on credit rating and the ability to make large purchases, debtors may wish to consider other, less drastic alternatives. 

 

If the debtor's financial problems are only temporary, he or she may want to ask creditors to accept lower payments or to schedule payments over a longer period of time. Creditors may be receptive to these ideas if the debtor has been a prompt payer in the past, or if the specter of bankruptcy is raised, since creditors know that once a bankruptcy proceeding is initiated they will probably collect only a portion of what is owed. In addition, creditors may wish to avoid the difficulties of a court proceeding to collect on the debt, which can be time-consuming and expensive. 

 

Consumer credit counselors can also help creditors work out a repayment plan. Some so-called "credit counselors," however, prey on overwhelmed consumers, promising "a clean slate," often for a flat, up-front fee. They may promise to contact creditors and convince them to accept lower payments or to charge lower fees and interest rates. In many cases, unfortunately, the only ones who end up in better financial shape as a result of these "efforts" (or the lack thereof) are the counseling organizations themselves, while the consumers are left with even fewer resources as a result of high fees and more delinquent debts.

 

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